The Trends Behind The Drum Design Awards’ 2022 Shortlist

The Drum’s Design Awards are the best showcase of the aesthetics of advertising. Every year our Judges pore over hundreds of entries that each exemplify the very best mix of execution, art and Commerce.

2022’s Design Awards nominations are no different: our Judges have shortlisted the Absolute Heights of design work from our submitted entries and have – with difficulty – narrowed them down to the final list of potential winners.

Trends this year among the shortlisted entries include a renewed focus on colorful creative to match the world coming back into bloom following the Pandemic. At the same time, a newfound focus on experimentation has seen out-of-home (OOH) advertising live up to its fullest potential, using the aesthetics of the natural world that surround them to enhance the creative.

Some of the most impressive entries this year played with the form of the advertising medium. The Guardian celebrated its 200th year in existence with an ad that highlighted its continuing mission. Meanwhile, Vault49 contributed to the ongoing Black Lives Matter campaign by recreating the placards and poster boards that are emblematic of historical protests.

To highlight the issue of litter on and around Britain’s coasts, Hubbub and Out of Order Design created the world’s first Disco Bin, which lights up and plays music when used. It reduced litter in surrounding areas by 42%, according to scientific Surveying by Ellipsis Earth. It is a prime example of using marketing to change the public’s behavior, both in the short and longer term.

Other entries employed a mixed-media approach – not just in how they fit within the wider advertising campaign, but within the creative itself. WMH & I combined film techniques, various montages, animation and Collage Styles to Advertise Glenlivet, while UKTV Creative created a series of animations – each relating to a program on Drama – and projected them on the walls during a live-action shoot with Jenny Agutter.

Nomint took a year to create a film on behalf of the WWF, using “an innovative combination of 3D printing, mold-making and ice sculpting to create 500 unique polar bear ice sculptures that were then used to create the stop-motion animation.” More than 1000 liters of ice were used to create the polar bear sculptures and environment, demonstrating that great design goes beyond creating a single effective image.

The full shortlist for The Drum Design Awards can be found here.

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